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NSF Research Traineeship Programs
First Annual Meeting
University of Maryland, May 2-3, 2016
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About

Launched in 2015, NSF’s new NRT program has now made awards to 18 teams for developing innovative graduate training programs. The winners of this highly selective competition represent some of the most creative approaches to STEM training, and they are drawn from diverse fields across the United States. This meeting brought these teams together for the first time to share ideas, develop strategies for long-term success, hear from experts in STEM training, and participate in a national-level discussion on the future of STEM training. The first two days of the event were discussion-intensive and focused on sharing ideas and innovative practices to improve NRT programs and the preparation of NRT trainees. The event brought together students, faculty, and program coordinators involved in the NSF Research Traineeship program, and featured invited experts in graduate training and STEM fields. The first two days of the meeting started a discussion about innovation in graduate training that carried into the ‘outward-facing’ third day of Future STEM Leaders in Washington, D.C. on May 4th, 2016.  

On May 25th and 26th, NRT programs met for a separate, program evaluator workshop, which was hosted by UC Berkeley’s NRT program (Data Sciences for the 21st Century: Environment and Society).  Information about this meeting, including supplementary materials can be found at the 2016 NRT Evaluators Workshop website.

NSF Research Traineeship

The NSF Research Traineeship (NRT) program is designed to encourage the development and implementation of new and interdisciplinary models for STEM graduate education and training. It aims to help students develop the skills, knowledge, and competencies needed to pursue a range of STEM careers.

Goals and Outcomes

  • Share innovative practices to improve NRT programs and career preparation of NRT trainees
  • Enhance students’ professional communication skills
  • Develop practices that increase the NRT project impact
  • Engage in a candid discussion about what does and does not work in graduate STEM training

Schedule

Sessions will be driven by NRT team goals and needs.

Day One

Day Two

Atrium Prince Georges Room Atrium Charles Carroll Room
8:30-9:00 Registration & Coffee Registration & Coffee
9:00-9:30 Welcome and Introduction Session Brief recap/State of the Meeting
9:30-10:45 Goal Setting Skills/Sustainability
Building the perfect PhD: What are we trying to achieve, and why? Preparing STEM graduates for diverse careers. Preparing faculty to be effective guides
(Laura Lautz and Derek Patton)
Making a lasting difference: Program sustainability/scalability and infrastructure
(Jeff Kelly and Cathleen Simons)
10:45-11:00 Coffee Break Coffee Break
11:00-12:15 Community/Evaluation Community
Enhancing student ownership of your NRT program
(Ken Carter)
Getting the most out of formative assessment and advisory boards
(Colin Phillips and Cheryl Schwab)
Spreading the gospel: institutional and disciplinary scalability of NRT innovations
(Lorenzo Ciannelli)
Broadening participation in NRT programs (women, underrepresented minorities, international students)
(Marilyn Korhonen)
12:15-1:15 Lunch Break Lunch Break
1:15-2:30 Community/Evaluation Skills
Intellectual community building: barriers and bridges
(Henry Kautz)
(Not) reinventing the wheel: Drawing on insights in higher education research
(KerryAnn O’Meara)
DESE Session: Building student skills for data-enabled science
(Julie Dickerson, Tim Rogers, David Ackerly)
Communication: Hands-on practice and feedback
(Rochelle Newman)
2:30-2:45 Coffee Break Coffee Break
2:45-3:30 Team Takeaways Team Takeaways Team Takeaways Team Takeaways
3:30-5:00 Skills Wrap-Up
Effective science communication and communication training
(Michelle Paulsen)
Wrap-up session
5:30-6:15 Happy Hour (Kim Building)
6:15-8:15 Dinner (Kim Building)

Crowd-sourced session notes

During the meeting, teams crowd-sourced in Google Docs extensive notes on each of the sessions. They can be viewed here. Lots of information in there, but no guarantee to its comprehensibility if you weren’t there. Caveat emptor!

 


Session Leaders

 

Kenneth Carter, Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Massachusetts

Julie Dickerson, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Iowa State University

Lorenzo Ciannelli, Associate Professor Biological Oceanography, Oregon State University

Henry Kautz, Professor of Computer Science & Director of the Goergen Institute for Data Science, University of Rochester

Marilyn Korhonen, Associate Director, Center for Research Program Development and Enrichment, University of Oklahoma

Jeff Kelly, Professor of Biology & Director of the Oklahoma Biological Survey, University of Oklahoma

Laura Lautz, Associate Professor of Earth Sciences, Syracuse University

Derek Patton, Associate Professor of Polymer Science and Engineering, University of Southern Mississippi

Rochelle Newman, Professor of Hearing and Speech Sciences & Assoc. Dir. of the Language Science Center, University of Maryland

KerryAnn O’Meara, Professor of Higher Education & Director of ADVANCE Program, University of Maryland

Colin Phillips, Professor of Linguistics & Director of Language Science Center, University of Maryland

Tim Rogers, Professor of Psychology & Director of Knowledge and Concepts Laboratory, University of Wisconsin

Cheryl Schwab, Program Evaluator, University of California, Berkeley

Cathleen Simons, Evaluation Consultant, Quality Evaluation Design


Photo album

And we have started to upload pictures from the meeting. Check back for many more.

 


Venues

Adele Stamp

All daytime activities will take place in one of three rooms in the Adele H. Stamp Student Union:

  • Prince George’s Room
  • Stamp Atrium
  • Charles Carroll Room

Kim

The banquet on Monday, May 2nd will take place in the Rotunda in the Kim Building.
The dinner on Monday, May 2nd will take place in the Rotunda in the Kim Building.

Meeting Transportation

Transportation from Hotels to Campus (May 2 – 3, 2016)

Guests staying at the Hilton Garden Inn will have access to a free shuttle.  Please be sure to check with hotel staff if you plan to make use of the shuttle.  For guests at the Best Western and Quality Inn, walking and biking are great options.  If you would prefer to commute by car or taxi, please find information below.  Additional information on walking, driving, and using hotel shuttles in the side menus.

Excellent Green Ride Cab Service – (240) 475-3387

Parking On Campus – If you plan to drive to campus, the best place to park is in the Union Lane Garage.  This garage is next door to our meeting space and utilizes an electronic payment system ($15/day). Please find a campus parking map below.

Union Lane Garage

Best Western

Best Western Plus
8419 Baltimore Ave
College Park, MD 20740

1. Walking: The hotel is located a 1 mile walk from the Adele H. Stamp Student Union. Head south on Rt. 1/Baltimore Ave. Turn right just beyond Looney’s Pub to cross the bridge and proceed on the path through the computer science buildings to Stadium Drive. Continue on Stadium Drive for 1/4 of a mile and turn left onto Regents Drive. Proceed past the parking garage to the traffic circle and turn right onto Campus  Drive. Stamp will be on your right.

2. Driving: The hotel is only a 5 minute drive from the parking garage located nearest Stamp. Head south on Rt. 1/Baltimore Ave and turn right onto Campus Drive. Drive through the traffic circle (straight) and then turn right onto Union Lane. The entrance to the parking garage will be on your left. Please be sure to note your space number before heading to the electronic meter near the stairwell.

Quality Inn

Quality Inn & Suites
7200 Baltimore Ave
College Park, MD 20740

1. Walking: The hotel is located a 1 mile walk from the Adele H. Stamp Student Union. Head north on Rt. 1/Baltimore Ave. Turn right onto Regents Drive. Turn left at the the traffic circle onto Campus Drive. Stamp will be on your right.

2. Driving: The hotel is only a 5 minute drive from the parking garage located nearest Stamp. Head south on Rt. 1/Baltimore Ave and turn right onto Campus Drive. Drive through the traffic circle (straight) and then turn right onto Union Lane. The entrance to the parking garage will be on your left. Please be sure to note your space number before heading to the electronic meter near the stairwell.

Hilton Garden Inn

Hilton Garden Inn
7810 Walker Dr.
Greenbelt, MD 20770

1. Driving: The hotel is only a 15 minute drive from the parking garage located nearest Stamp. Head west on Greenbelt Rd./193 and use the left lanes to merge onto MD-201 S/Kenilworth Ave. After 2 miles, turn right onto Paint Branch Pkwy and continue onto Campus Drive after crossing Rt. 1/Baltimore Ave.  Drive through the traffic circle (straight) and then turn right onto Union Lane. The entrance to the parking garage will be on your left. Please be sure to note your space number before heading to the electronic meter near the stairwell.

2. Hotel Shuttle: The Hilton offers a free shuttle service within a 5 mile radius.  We suggest scheduling this service with hotel staff to get to and from campus.

Local Information

If you’re in town early and looking for something to do or places to eat, there are a number of places that are just a short walk or drive/Uber ride away.

Hyattsville

These are just a short 5-10 minute drive down Route 1 from all hotels. A bit far to walk, but worth a shared Uber ride, if that’s how you roll. Hyattsville is the next ‘burb south of College Park, and it’s the newly hip area where grad students now want to live.

Busboys and Poets: Hip DC-area chain with casual dining restaurant, bar, and (largely political) bookstore. If you’re (un)lucky you might run into one of their poetry nights.
Franklin’s Brewery and General StoreA local favorite. Brewpub + quirky toy/gift store. From burgers and pizzas to some fancier stuff. But it’s the beer and toys that people go there for. The place that started Hyattsville’s renaissance.
Tara Thai
: Local underwater-themed chain featuring classic Thai dishes. Less character than the other two.
Shagga Coffee (Ethiopian). It looks like a thinly disguised donut shop, and it is. But DC is the place for Ethiopian, and this place is a surprisingly good mom-and-pop Ethiopian restaurant.

College Park

We wish you were visiting us a couple of years from now. CP is currently undergoing a makeover, but for now that means that the options are still limited. But there are a few decent places within walking distance of the Quality Inn and Best Western hotels. Yelp, of course, is a good place to start. Here are some that we might use.

The Board and Brew (north end of campus): Expansive coffee shop with small plates, sandwiches, and ok beer selection, plus over 500 board games. The locals are really happy that this place has opened up in town.
Hanami Japanese Restaurant (north end of campus): small Japanese restaurant serving sushi, noodles, hibachi & more.
Pho Thom (downtown area): popular Vietnamese/Thai place.
Jason’s Deli (downtown area): More of a lunch place, but they have lots of choices and a big salad bar.
The Common (at Marriott on west side of campus). This hotel restaurant/pub recently serves contemporary American cuisine. Its recent makeover made it dramatically more congenial. Definitely worthwhile if you’re staying over there, but not worth the trip if you’re not.
Nando’s Peri Peri (downtown area). Recently open chain chicken place is decently tasty.
Plato’s Diner (adjacent to Quality Inn). Well, it’s a diner. But their Greek fare is supposed to be above par.


Participating Universities

UC Berkeley

Environment and Society

Colorado State

Biosensing and Computational Biology

Duke University

Bioinformatics for Microbiomes

Georgia Tech

Movement Science and Robotics

University of Georgia

Disease Ecology

Iowa State

Plant Biology

University of Maryland

Language Science

UMass Amherst

Soft Materials for Life Sciences

Northwestern University

Astronomy, Physics, and Earth Science

University of Oklahoma

Aero-ecology

Oregon State University

Marine Science and Policy

Penn State University

Computation, electronic structure of materials

University of Rochester

Computer science, cognitive science and neuroscience

Southern Miss

Biolubrication, Biomaterials, and Renewable Energy

Syracuse University

Water-energy research

Texas A&M University

Energy technology

Virginia Tech

Modeling, Understanding, and Advancing Urban Populations

University of Wisconsin

Human and Machine Learning and Teaching